Soul Gardening

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hops

Note: I originally wrote this last year ago but didn’t have a place to put it. Now I have this blog, so here it goes. With a picture of some of the hops we grew last year!

This weekend I found a number of apples on our tree had become infested with codling moth larvae. I picked them all and discarded them—if left on the tree, the moths will reproduce and increase the infestation next year.

When we first moved into our house a few years ago, the old. neglected apple tree had sparse foliage and was covered with small, wormy fruit. The following year I began fertilizing the tree and culling apples, setting moth traps, spraying it with neem oil, and watering it regularly. We had enough apples to make cider at the end of the year. The next year the apples were bigger, and we made a large batch of apple butter.

In the front yard, we initially placed a few vegetable beds. They were overshadowed by the hedge and pollinators didn’t arrive in large enough numbers to do much of anything. The next year my wife planted wild-flowers alongside the vegetables, drawing in more pollinators. Last year I cut down the old shrubbery and uprooted it, and we had a tree removal service rip out the hedge. A fence was installed and I built three more beds where we planted corn, beans, peppers, and squash.

This year there’s more life in the yard than ever before. A pair of thrushes have made a nest in the eaves. Songbirds of varying kinds arrive to eat seeds and catch bugs. The useful insects like ladybugs have proliferated. But the work continues: almost every weekend we spend a couple of hours tending the trees, weeding, planting, fertilizing. And we can’t control catastrophes like the winter hard freeze that killed most of our winter harvest. Setbacks show up without warning.

All this has made me much more appreciative of the agricultural metaphors that are so often used in scripture. Jesus uses these terms talking about vine and branch, seed and harvest, the preparation of soil… it was easy for me to see this as more of a static image of the Church before. We have the right disposition, the faith grows. Problem solved. But as Christ’s audience no doubt knew at the time, the metaphors he’s giving imply years of hard work, setbacks and disasters, and constant work before real fruitfulness is in evidence. Cultivating faith can never come with a “quick fix”. And even a well-tended garden can be damaged overnight in ways that take a long time to recover from.

It’s tempting to be impatient and demand results right away. Oftentimes this is what happens within parishes by gung-ho volunteers or among people involved in other Catholic endeavors. But that’s not how it happens. Like the garden, you’re going to see a bud here, a flower there—along with not a few plants that wither and die. People will offer you supposed miracle products to speed up the process. But slow diligence will be the only way of making things pay off, and of creating a healthy, diverse ecosystem.

 

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